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Where Noah Landed?

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Mount Ararat (where Noah's Ark landed)
From Strata in the November/December 2014 issue of BAR
Biblical Archaeology Society Staff • 05/27/2018
Still another group is looking for Mt. Ararat, where the Bible says Noah landed after the flood. This group is looking to confirm the tradition that nearby Mt. Cudi (Judi Dagh) is really Mt. Ararat, as recorded in the Quran, Sura 11.44.
They have not uncovered much scientific evidence to date, but they do have an intriguing Assyrian relief, which may explain why a local tradition regards Mt. Cudi as Mt. Ararat.
This photo was taken some months ago on the slopes of Mt. Cudi near the Turkish village of Sah. The figure, who has not yet been identified, dates to a period earlier than Sennacherib (who ruled 705–681 B.C.); there is no accompanying inscription. He has his right hand raised in a gesture of reverence and holds a staff of office in his left hand.
Alan Millard, Emeritus Rankin Professor of Hebrew and Ancient Semitic Languages at the Un…

Sword of Saint Peter.

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Sword of Saint Peter.
The Sword of Saint Peter (Polish: Miecz świętego Piotra) is allegedly the sword with which the Apostle Peter cut off the right ear of the high priest's servant at the time of Jesus' arrest in Gethsemane.
The sword is wide-tipped, similar in shape to a dussack or machete. It is in the Poznań Archdiocesan Museum.
An exact copy of the sword, made by Bogdan Puchalski, is displayed on the wall of the Poznań Archcathedral Basilica.
History
The sword is mentioned for the first time in the 1609 Vitae Episcoporum Posnaniensium of Jan Długosz as being the original Roman sword (Gladius) used by Saint Peter in the Gospels, or a direct copy made for Pope Stephen VII. However, at that time Stephen was already dead, and the current pope was John XIII.
The sword arrived in Poznań in 968 as a gift from John XIII for either Bishop Jordan or Duke Mieszko I. The Archdeacon of Poznań Cathedral in 1699 wrote about the sword, describing it as a part of St. Peter's sword brought t…

Rare ancient Hebrew scroll deciphered

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20 Jul 2015 ​Modern technologies made it possible for the first time to read the contents of a burnt scroll that was found forty five years ago in archaeological excavations at Ein Gedi, on the western shore of the Dead Sea. (Communicated by the Israel Antiquities Authority Spokesperson)

For the first time, advanced technologies made it possible to read parts of a scroll that was completely burnt c. 1,500 years, inside the Holy Ark of the synagogue at Ein Gedi. At the end of extremely challenging efforts, which lasted over a year, the scientists and researchers were amazed to see verses from the beginning of the Book of Leviticus, suddenly coming back to life.

The rare find was presented today (Monday, July 20 2015) at a press conference in Jerusalem, attended by Minister of Culture and Sports Miri Regev and Israel Antiquities Authority Director Israel Hasson.

The parchment scroll was unearthed in 1970 in archaeological excavations in the synagogue at Ein Gedi, headed by…

Book of Leviticus Verses Recovered from Burnt Hebrew Bible Scroll Oldest Hebrew Bible scroll since the Dead Sea Scrolls found at Ein Gedi

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Book of Leviticus Verses Recovered from Burnt Hebrew Bible Scroll Oldest Hebrew Bible scroll since the Dead Sea Scrolls found at Ein Gedi A charred Hebrew Bible scroll was discovered in the Torah ark in a Byzantine synagogue at Ein Gedi, Israel. Photo: Shai Halevi, Israel Antiquities Authority.A charred Hebrew Bible scroll was discovered in the Torah ark in a Byzantine synagogue at Ein Gedi, Israel. Photo: Shai Halevi, Israel Antiquities Authority.
A burnt ancient scroll found in 1970 has finally been deciphered thanks to advanced digital technology. Four and a half decades after its discovery, the scroll was recently revealed to contain a passage from the Book of Leviticus. Excavated from the Torah ark of a Byzantine-period synagogue at Ein Gedi in Israel, the scroll had been victim to a fire that raged through the entire village. The scroll is considered to be the oldest Hebrew Bible scroll discovered since the Dead Sea Scrolls. Furthermore, the discovery represents the first time a T…

The Te’omim Cave: Rebel Hideout and Cult Site Jerusalem hills cave reveals layers of history

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During the Bar-Kokhba Revolt (132–136 C.E.), Jewish rebels sought refuge from the Roman army in secret hideouts throughout Judea. One such hideout was the Te’omim Cave, a massive cave complex in the Jerusalem hills west of the city. There, within the innermost chambers of the cave, archaeologists discovered three hoards of Roman, Judean and revolt coins, weapons and pottery evidently hidden by the rebels.
The Te’omim Cave wasn’t just a safe haven for Jewish insurgents. In “Roman Cult, Jewish Rebels Share Jerusalem Cave Site” in the November/December 2017 issue of BAR, Boaz Zissu, Eitan Klein, Roi Porat, Boaz Langford and Amos Frumkin describe the multiple uses of the Jerusalem hills cave throughout antiquity, including its role as a pagan cultic site in the second–fourth centuries C.E.

Archaeologist Micka Ullman stands in the large entrance hall of the Te’omim Cave in the Jerusalem hills. Photo: Courtesy of Boaz Zissu.
The first comprehensive survey of the Te’omim Cave was…

This 8th century BC (The Israelite Period) cook pot as it was found (in situ) in a domestic context at Tall el-Hammam, Jordan.

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long-time research into how people lived in the biblical world and my years in the field excavating the cities where they lived gives me a reason to offer an opinion! So, here is a bit of insight about how ancient people lived – from both the Bible and archaeology. 
This 8th century BC (The Israelite Period) cook pot as it was found (in situ) in a domestic context at Tall el-Hammam, Jordan.
What They Ate
The most famous phrase suggesting what the ancient Israelites ate in the Promised Land indicated it was a place “flowing with milk and honey,” first mentioned in Exodus 3:8. It suggests the Holy Land as a place of flocks and herds as well as agricultural produce. The “honey” might represent bee honey or could well be one of the syrupy products made from the Promised Land’s summer fruits – date or fig “honey.”
The “milk” of the region suggests it was an appropriate place for flocks and herds which would thus provide the widely–used dairy products of that day. Such a phrase s…

Missionary Journeys of Paul

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Paul’s journey to Rome that concludes the book of Acts is one of the most exciting stories in ancient literature. It recounts the fateful shipwreck that occurred west of Crete, and ends in Rome, the seat of the Christian world for over 1500 years. Before he and his followers came to Rome, however, two of Paul’s missionary journeys came to Greece, where his work formed the foundation of some of Christianity’s earliest congregations. we will visit Thessalonica, Philippi, and Berea where Paul established churches on his second journey. We stop at Neapolis to walk on a well-preserved section of the ancient , the Via Egnatia. We will visit Actium – where Octavian defeated Antony and Cleopatra in the famous battle in 31 B.C., and nearby Nicopolis, where Paul spent the winter.

THESSALONICA.
Paul established the church here on his second journey (Acts 17:1-9) and later wrote two letters to the Thessalonians. 
ACTIUM, NICOPOLIS and Museum - Preveza.
Our first stop is in Berea where …